Seasonal Affective
Throughout the course of 2021 I worked as an exploration geologist within the Arctic Circle, as such, I’m accustomed to Earth’s orbit around our Sun and the ensuing seasonal variation in daylength - which fell as short as three hours at winter’s height. Increased obliquity of sunlight and subsequent reduced daylight proposedly hinders the production of serotonin and can effect the body’s circadian rhythm, leading to depressive symptoms.
When returning to the UK on leave, photography is my sole creative outlet, facilitating escape from London on exciting multi-day hikes through the UK’s national parks, or, more often, a morning stroll through Richmond Park to wonder aimlessly among the veteran oaks, coffee and camera in hand.
There is, then, a certain satire in that this seasonal fluctuation in sunlight affects both my mental self and my expressive outlet - which is explicitly creating a record of light. This collection of landscapes, and more intimate scenes, describes my interpretation of Britain’s outdoors through the often stoic and melancholic veil of the hibernal season.